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Lux aeterna (multiple choirs with ensemble)

by Joseph Twist (2011)

Selected products featuring this work — Display all products (1 more)

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Work Overview

Australia has some of the most intense sunlight in the world. I am often nostalgic about the great clarity of daylight in Queensland, where I grew up, enjoying the languorous and overbearing warmth in summer, the smell of bitumen steaming during a summer storm, or the endless clear blue sky on a crisp, sunny winter morning. Lux Aeterna is a kind of ritualistic musical celebration of the intense, abundant Australian sunlight and the Australian summer. The "Lux Aeterna" Gregorian chant and text, with its description of "perpetual light" (luceat eis) in a sense refers to our own translucent and unremitting Australain sunlight. The musical effect is both luminous and harsh, particularly with the use of cluster chords, jazz harmony and bizzare vocal effects, as a kind of musical depiction of shimmering heat on a hot day. Combined with this are the inspiring words of Michael Leunig, which highlight the joy and fun of summertime with its glorious sunlight.

Work Details

Year: 2011

Instrumentation: Treble choir, SSAA choir, SATB choir, percussion (vibraphone, xylophone), piano, optional handbells.

Duration: 10 min.

Difficulty: Advanced — Many simple vocal parts, difficult rhythmic playing for percussion and piano.

Dedication note: Dedicated to John Nolan

Commission note: Commissioned by Gondwana Choirs.. Commissioned for the Gondwana National Choral School, 2011

First performance: by Gondwana Choirs, Lyn Williams, Bree van Reyk, Sally Whitwell — 22 Jan 11. Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music


Performances of this work

22 Jan 11: Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Featuring Gondwana Choirs, Lyn Williams, Bree van Reyk, Sally Whitwell.

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